Category Archives: Basics

For today’s episode of PianoTV, we’re going to try a new Q&A format. Previously we did a big monthly Q&A where I answer four of your questions, but I’d like to try breaking that big video into shorter weekly ones.

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Allysia has been teaching piano in Canada for nearly a decade, and has her Grade 10 RCM certificate. She especially enjoys nerding out to music history and theory. When she’s not making videos or teaching, she’s reading, writing, and jamming in a rock band.

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In today’s PianoTV tutorial, we’re going to look at Minuet in G Minor, Anh. 115, from the Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach. We’ve done it’s happier major twin on this channel before, so check it out if you missed it.

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Allysia has been teaching piano in Canada for nearly a decade, and has her Grade 10 RCM certificate. She especially enjoys nerding out to music history and theory. When she’s not making videos or teaching, she’s reading, writing, and jamming in a rock band.

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So you’re playing your piece, and suddenly you come across a strange, squiggly line. What does it mean? How do you play it? That’s going to be the topic of today’s video.

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Allysia has been teaching piano in Canada for nearly a decade, and has her Grade 10 RCM certificate. She especially enjoys nerding out to music history and theory. When she’s not making videos or teaching, she’s reading, writing, and jamming in a rock band.

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Today we’re going to talk theory – specifically, how to key signatures.

I am going to show you a music reading trick that blew my mind when I first learned it. I don’t usually throw around big phrases like “in the world”, but when I do, it’s because there’s some serious mind-blowing power involved.

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Allysia has been teaching piano in Canada for nearly a decade, and has her Grade 10 RCM certificate. She especially enjoys nerding out to music history and theory. When she’s not making videos or teaching, she’s reading, writing, and jamming in a rock band.

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Scales are something that I like to work on with all of my students. They can sometimes seem like a drag, though, so I wanted to talk about why exactly I find them so useful.

In today’s video, I also wanted to look at how to build a major scale. Every single key on the piano (all 12, if you include the black keys), when plugged into a formula, is the start of a scale. So you can have C major scale, Db major scale, D major scale, and so on.

Each of these scales has a unique pattern of black keys and white keys. We’ll take a look at how to figure that out – it isn’t super difficult, but it’s pretty useful to know. Even if you still end up Googling the notes of a major scale, it’s important to know how that came to be.

Let’s get started!
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Allysia has been teaching piano in Canada for nearly a decade, and has her Grade 10 RCM certificate. She especially enjoys nerding out to music history and theory. When she’s not making videos or teaching, she’s reading, writing, and jamming in a rock band.